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Whenever I am running certain programs, I get this message as they start up:

<program> - No Disk

There is no disk in the drive. Please insert a disk into drive /Device/Harddisk5/DR10

I have no idea what this means, or why it keeps popping up; for example, running Spybot S&D will make it pop up for each bot it searches for, while running other programs will only make it pop up when the program starts. In each case, continuing through this error allows things to run normally (except for Spybot, who, with over 200k definitions it tries to check, is unable to be used).

If anyone can give me some idea as to what's going on, what needs to be fixed/updated, or what drivers need to be acquired, I would be very grateful. Thank you.

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Last Post by gerbil
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Try putting a disc in each drive you have, and hopefully the message will change to something more descriptive, like "file XXXX not found". If that works you could uninstall/repair/fix registry/whatever based on the new info.

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Do you have an anti-malware program set to check the floppy drives or the CD?

Yes, Spybot S&D.

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Try putting a disc in each drive you have, and hopefully the message will change to something more descriptive, like "file XXXX not found". If that works you could uninstall/repair/fix registry/whatever based on the new info.

This had no effect, sadly. any other ideas?

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Would you mind listing all the drives of any sort [including your hdd partitions] that you have along with their drive letters, please? Include cd/dvd, zip...

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Would you mind listing all the drives of any sort [including your hdd partitions] that you have along with their drive letters, please? Include cd/dvd, zip...

A: Floppy
C: Removable Drive
D: CD/DVD
E: Compact Flash
F: Smart Media
G: Memory Stick
H: Local Disk
I: SD Card

There is a partition on the H: drive for recovery purposes.

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Sorry, I just assumed it, and forgot to ask: which drive contains your OS? I was thinking that you might have it on hdd lettered higher than a removable drive, in which case Windows can have trouble with it. It likes to be on drive letters lower than any removable, or removable disk, drive except for floppy drives which it expects to find at A:, B:.
Further, it does seem to prefer ANY hdd partitions to be lettered lower then removable drives. Just for fun I tested that last night by plugging in another, fresh Sata drive and formatting a partition onto it lettered higher than my cd/dvd drive; all was fine and usable until I tried a restart... windows took forever to load, and I just forced a shutdown in the end.
If your OS is on that removable drive C: then who knows how windows would behave? I have not seen an explanation for this behaviour... so I tend to think of it as a bug. It does not always behave badly when the OS is on a higher lettered drive than a removable. It does not seem concerned by drive images.
Anyone else got some enlightenment?

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Just an addendum.... when I created the partitions on that new drive I used drive letters higher than my CD/DVD and two drive images... I tried at least 3 times to start windows, but explorer would not work fully. I had my desktop, but the links would not work, explorer.exe was in TM as a process. What is a bit intriguing is that by using TM I could start a second instance of explorer, something which is not normally allowed [if in a running windows you try to start a second explorer shell a check is made to see if it is already running, if so then the second shell creation is dumped]. So although in the session where I created those partitions I could use them, in subsequent restart attempts explorer would not run properly.
I used PartedMagic to delete those partitions, and then to create a new one [drive letters are a Windows thing, Linux doesn't let you assign them]. Restarted the sys to Windows XP and it was/is fine.... XP assigned to it a spare drive letter lower than those of my CD/DVD & drive images, and seems satisfied. Okay, I know this is just a test sample of one, and is not exactly your problem, but I wanted to illustrate how Windows can fail if removable drives have lower letters assigned than hdd partitions. By lower I mean closer to A.
Does anyone know the reason?

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