0

I have a Toshiba Satellite m55-s3293 laptop that came loaded with XP home Edition. I pretty sure that I upgraded to XP Pro. It will not load and gives me the following message: “We apologize for the inconvenience, but Windows did not start successfully. A recent hardware or software change might have caused this.”

It won’t start in safe mode or normally nor will it start in the last known good configuration setting. When I try each mode it defaults to the original error message…I do not have the original Toshiba disks but the product key is on the back of the unit. I do have a copy of the XP disk. My other issue is the CD drive does not work so I can’t re-load XP to see if it works.

Here’s what I’ve done:
- I have purchased a hard drive enclosure and have copied many of my files to my external hard drive. I couldn’t copy some of the files (asked for permission but kept defaulting to the question) but it’s not a life or death situation.
- I have also purchased a portable cd drive in hopes that it can be used in resolving this issue

Any assistance is appreciated

3
Contributors
26
Replies
27
Views
6 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by gerbil
0

Hi, lexlap. First thing is to check your hard disk for correctable errors. Grab that XP CD disk, insert it into your spanking CD drive and restart your computer. If you are prompted, select any options required to start (boot) from the CD.
When the text-based part of Setup begins, follow the prompts. Select the repair or recover option by pressing R. When you are prompted, type the Administrator password.
At the command prompt, type...
chkdsk /r
When it completes it will list the results. Restart without the XP CD, see if Windows loads. Say how you get on. The options are rather limited, here.
By the way, any recovery process could have been done with a USB flash drive [with a bit more bother], but a cd drive may come in handy one other day.

0

Hi, lexlap. First thing is to check your hard disk for correctable errors. Grab that XP CD disk, insert it into your spanking CD drive and restart your computer. If you are prompted, select any options required to start (boot) from the CD.
When the text-based part of Setup begins, follow the prompts. Select the repair or recover option by pressing R. When you are prompted, type the Administrator password.
At the command prompt, type...
chkdsk /r
When it completes it will list the results. Restart without the XP CD, see if Windows loads. Say how you get on. The options are rather limited, here.
By the way, any recovery process could have been done with a USB flash drive [with a bit more bother], but a cd drive may come in handy one other day.

Thank you for your reply. I was told not to use the consol and use the install instead and xp will give me another chance to do the repair without losing the saved data on my HD....It worked as prescribed untilto after the accept lisc. agreement screen. Instead of allowing me to begin a repair my options are:
1. To set up windows xp on the selected items, press enter
2. To create a partition in the unpartitioned space, press c
3. To delete the selected partition, press D.

Here's what's selcted:
C: Partition1 (SQ00398) (NTFS) 95205 MB (57693 MB free)

I'm now stuck. Could this default be because this is a different xp version from the original istalled ver.? I'm using XP Pro and am pretty certain that I upgraded to this version and that's what's current on the system. At this stage the options I should have are to repair or new install. What should I do?


Here's a link to the instruction I was using. Thank you:

http://pcsupport.about.com/od/operatingsystems/ss/instxprepair1_6.htm

0

If you want to upgrade to newer version (XP pro in this case), might also do a fresh installation instead of upgrading. Unfortunately from my experience, your Home Premium product keys is invalid to be used for Professional so pretty much your upgrade failed.

From the above post, you've already choose to install XP fresh. If you do want to do a fresh install, select the partition which have the previous XP installation. Then it'll prompt to format. Choose 'Format as NTFS (Quick)'. Now it'll want to confirm your action. Press F to start the format and the installation will run by itself.

0

"I was told not to use the consol and use the install instead and xp will give me another chance to do the repair..."
Where were you told [or who told you] not to use the Recovery Console? That website you link to? At this stage, a Windows Repair is NOT the option you want, it is almost the last option to use. You want to simply check your hard drive for errors, and repair them if possible - that is available through the Recovery Console.
"I do have a copy of the XP disk"... fine, either XP Home or Pro disks will load the console for you. I understand some OEM or slipstreamed disks will not have the option. You can download and burn to a cd a Recovery Console from any of these sites:
http://www.thecomputerparamedic.com/files/rc.iso
http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/tools/bootdiscs/xp_rec_con.zip
-obtain the .iso file, then burn it to a cd.. ie burn the image [an iso file is a disk image].
Load that cd, it will run just like a normal Setup as it starts up.
A bit more...
"It worked as prescribed until after .... Instead of allowing me to begin a repair my options are:" Okay... if Setup determines that your installation is badly damaged [ie. unrecognisable] it won't give the Repair option at this stage. But you are past the RC option at this point, this is a Repair Installation, rather like a windows replacement. You got here and Setup only gave you the option to do a fresh installation... don't do it, not yet. Disk data damage is possibly why Setup cannot see the Windows files. We want to try to fix that first. Hence the RC.

Edited by gerbil: n/a

0

If you want to upgrade to newer version (XP pro in this case), might also do a fresh installation instead of upgrading. Unfortunately from my experience, your Home Premium product keys is invalid to be used for Professional so pretty much your upgrade failed.

From the above post, you've already choose to install XP fresh. If you do want to do a fresh install, select the partition which have the previous XP installation. Then it'll prompt to format. Choose 'Format as NTFS (Quick)'. Now it'll want to confirm your action. Press F to start the format and the installation will run by itself.

My disk is XP pro. My goal is not to do a fresh installtion but to do a repair. I do have the key to the pro disk...The screen that I am at now is supposed to recognize my currently installed version and then give me the option to repair it or do a fresh install. Since it does not acknowledge the installed version I don't know what to do to perform a repair from here. My preference is to preserve my installed data.

0

"I was told not to use the consol and use the install instead and xp will give me another chance to do the repair..."
Where were you told [or who told you] not to use the Recovery Console? That website you link to? At this stage, a Windows Repair is NOT the option you want, it is almost the last option to use. You want to simply check your hard drive for errors, and repair them if possible - that is available through the Recovery Console.
"I do have a copy of the XP disk"... fine, either XP Home or Pro disks will load the console for you. I understand some OEM or slipstreamed disks will not have the option. You can download and burn to a cd a Recovery Console from any of these sites:
http://www.thecomputerparamedic.com/files/rc.iso
http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/tools/bootdiscs/xp_rec_con.zip
-obtain the .iso file, then burn it to a cd.. ie burn the image [an iso file is a disk image].
Load that cd, it will run just like a normal Setup as it starts up.
A bit more...
"It worked as prescribed until after .... Instead of allowing me to begin a repair my options are:" Okay... if Setup determines that your installation is badly damaged [ie. unrecognisable] it won't give the Repair option at this stage. But you are past the RC option at this point, this is a Repair Installation, rather like a windows replacement. You got here and Setup only gave you the option to do a fresh installation... don't do it, not yet. Disk data damage is possibly why Setup cannot see the Windows files. We want to try to fix that first. Hence the RC.

I have exited the process and will check my disk through the console. I will keep you posted. Thank you.

0

"I was told not to use the consol and use the install instead and xp will give me another chance to do the repair..."
Where were you told [or who told you] not to use the Recovery Console? That website you link to? At this stage, a Windows Repair is NOT the option you want, it is almost the last option to use. You want to simply check your hard drive for errors, and repair them if possible - that is available through the Recovery Console.
"I do have a copy of the XP disk"... fine, either XP Home or Pro disks will load the console for you. I understand some OEM or slipstreamed disks will not have the option. You can download and burn to a cd a Recovery Console from any of these sites:
http://www.thecomputerparamedic.com/files/rc.iso
http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/tools/bootdiscs/xp_rec_con.zip
-obtain the .iso file, then burn it to a cd.. ie burn the image [an iso file is a disk image].
Load that cd, it will run just like a normal Setup as it starts up.
A bit more...
"It worked as prescribed until after .... Instead of allowing me to begin a repair my options are:" Okay... if Setup determines that your installation is badly damaged [ie. unrecognisable] it won't give the Repair option at this stage. But you are past the RC option at this point, this is a Repair Installation, rather like a windows replacement. You got here and Setup only gave you the option to do a fresh installation... don't do it, not yet. Disk data damage is possibly why Setup cannot see the Windows files. We want to try to fix that first. Hence the RC.

I burned the recovery disk. It started like the XP disk but now I am looking a a blue screen that says "windows setup" in the upper right hand corner and at the bottom it is saying "setup is starting Windows" It's been in this position for 25 min. How long is the process? Please advise. Thank you.

0

Hello, Lexlap, please try that disk you burned on a good system... when that "setup is starting Windows" label first appears you should see the Welcome to Setup screen with the option to enter the RC almost immediately, but it may take several minutes - it does depend upon machines. Windows is examining hardware at that stage, searching your disk for Windows installations. Once you get the cursor, enter...
exit
No harm will be done. Assuming the disk works, then retry in your bad laptop. If successful, the command you enter is...
chkdsk /r
About the examining hardware stage - it could be that your non-working cd drive is hanging your computer? Can you disconnect it [you get to rip the laptop apart, and there will be guides for doing just that on the web]?
If the RC disk is good as checked above but won't load the RC in the laptop, then you need to see if another bootable software can recognise your hdd. There are plenty of examples to use, but a good one would be here: http://www.partitionwizard.com/partition-wizard-bootable-cd.html
-either the bootable cd or bootable flashdrive version.
If this software boots your sys and displays your hdd then it is likely in good shape; the problem is elsewhere.

0

Hello, Lexlap, please try that disk you burned on a good system... when that "setup is starting Windows" label first appears you should see the Welcome to Setup screen with the option to enter the RC almost immediately, but it may take several minutes - it does depend upon machines. Windows is examining hardware at that stage, searching your disk for Windows installations. Once you get the cursor, enter...
exit
No harm will be done. Assuming the disk works, then retry in your bad laptop. If successful, the command you enter is...
chkdsk /r
About the examining hardware stage - it could be that your non-working cd drive is hanging your computer? Can you disconnect it [you get to rip the laptop apart, and there will be guides for doing just that on the web]?
If the RC disk is good as checked above but won't load the RC in the laptop, then you need to see if another bootable software can recognise your hdd. There are plenty of examples to use, but a good one would be here: http://www.partitionwizard.com/partition-wizard-bootable-cd.html
-either the bootable cd or bootable flashdrive version.
If this software boots your sys and displays your hdd then it is likely in good shape; the problem is elsewhere.

I'm not sure how relevant this is but while I was successfully testing the disk I ran memtest-86 on the bad laptop. It did not get very far before being "unexpected Interrupt - halting CPU"....
Pass - 2%
Test 76% ######################
Test #2 [Moving inversions, ones & zeros], : 216K - 1527M 1527M Using CPU:0
Pattern: ffffffffffff

After testing the disk I inserted it back into the bad laptop and received the same response. I will now disconnect the internal CD player.

0

Hello, Lexlap, please try that disk you burned on a good system... when that "setup is starting Windows" label first appears you should see the Welcome to Setup screen with the option to enter the RC almost immediately, but it may take several minutes - it does depend upon machines. Windows is examining hardware at that stage, searching your disk for Windows installations. Once you get the cursor, enter...
exit
No harm will be done. Assuming the disk works, then retry in your bad laptop. If successful, the command you enter is...
chkdsk /r
About the examining hardware stage - it could be that your non-working cd drive is hanging your computer? Can you disconnect it [you get to rip the laptop apart, and there will be guides for doing just that on the web]?
If the RC disk is good as checked above but won't load the RC in the laptop, then you need to see if another bootable software can recognise your hdd. There are plenty of examples to use, but a good one would be here: http://www.partitionwizard.com/partition-wizard-bootable-cd.html
-either the bootable cd or bootable flashdrive version.
If this software boots your sys and displays your hdd then it is likely in good shape; the problem is elsewhere.

Decided to try the XP disk one last time and it booted properly. I am now running chkdsk /r

0

Mmm. that is not a typical memory error message. i'd say something else crashed the CPU. Anyway, chkdsk is at least running now, and that's a start. It should be reasonably quick, dep on hdd size and errors.

0

Mmm. that is not a typical memory error message. i'd say something else crashed the CPU. Anyway, chkdsk is at least running now, and that's a start. It should be reasonably quick, dep on hdd size and errors.

Here's the result from the chkdsk scan:
chkdsk found and fixed one or more errors on the volume.
97490420 kilobytes total disk space.
59055252 kilobytes are available.

4096 bytes in each allocation unit
24372605 total allocation units on disk
14763813 allocation units available on disk.

c\windows>

0

Mmm. that is not a typical memory error message. i'd say something else crashed the CPU. Anyway, chkdsk is at least running now, and that's a start. It should be reasonably quick, dep on hdd size and errors.

After restarting without the disk it defaulted to the original "we apologize" error. I tried everry mode.

0

Okay. Pity. So it could be system file damage, or registry file damage. Or a hardware problem... As a point, at what stage does Safe Mode loading jam - what driver file is the last loaded?
Can your machine run Memtest86+ for, say, half an hour with zero errors now?
Think hard... about how much free space do you have on your hard disk? 8 or 10 GB, say?
I ask because you have a Toshiba that came with an OEM installation. You don't have the Tosh disks, but you have an XP cd and the code - have you used this disk to reinstall the OS with that code? Thing is, we cn try to copy over the original registry files with the Recovery Console, but on just a few OEM installations that can cause another problem...

Edited by gerbil: n/a

0

I had to take a few days off for travel. I removed the internal cd and ran the RC again. The results were:
97490420 kb total disk space
59055248 kb are available

4096 bytes in each allocation unit
24372605 total allocatation units on disk

I re-booted and it defaulted to original "We apologize..." message.

Where do I go from here?
14763812 allocation units available on disk

0

Okay. Pity. So it could be system file damage, or registry file damage. Or a hardware problem... As a point, at what stage does Safe Mode loading jam - what driver file is the last loaded?
Can your machine run Memtest86+ for, say, half an hour with zero errors now?
Think hard... about how much free space do you have on your hard disk? 8 or 10 GB, say?
I ask because you have a Toshiba that came with an OEM installation. You don't have the Tosh disks, but you have an XP cd and the code - have you used this disk to reinstall the OS with that code? Thing is, we cn try to copy over the original registry files with the Recovery Console, but on just a few OEM installations that can cause another problem...

Memtest-86 v3.5b runs for about 1 min
On the main page of the bios, the system memory is 640 and extended memory is 1526 MB

59055248 kb are available on HD. I have not used this disk to re-install the OS with the code on the back of the laptop. When I upgraded with this CD I used the install code that came with the copy.

0

No problems here with your taking some time away, Lexlap. At this stage, the problem appears to be hardware related, and I'd be tempted now to plump for a memory failure. You could exclude the hard drive from being suspected by unplugging it. Memtest doesn't look at the hdd, but BIOS notes it, and it just could somehow be interfering with the system bus. While you are into the innards, replug the memory stick, then rerun Memtest. Try the other mem slot. Say how it goes. If Memtest fails again then testing with a replacement [1GB] stick would be next. A friendly tech might lend you one...
1GB? I always think 512MB is really too small for windows.

Edited by gerbil: n/a

0

No problems here with your taking some time away, Lexlap. At this stage, the problem appears to be hardware related, and I'd be tempted now to plump for a memory failure. You could exclude the hard drive from being suspected by unplugging it. Memtest doesn't look at the hdd, but BIOS notes it, and it just could somehow be interfering with the system bus. While you are into the innards, replug the memory stick, then rerun Memtest. Try the other mem slot. Say how it goes. If Memtest fails again then testing with a replacement [1GB] stick would be next. A friendly tech might lend you one...
1GB? I always think 512MB is really too small for windows.

You may be on to something. I umplugged the HD but the lap wouldn't boot. I then removed the top memory stick - It appears to be a 1G, Corsair Value Select VS1GSDS333 - and am now running memtest. It is currently running without errors.

0

Memtest complete with no errors. Looks like the issue is with stick that I removed.

0

I just tried to boot with the suspect memory still out. Lap defaulted to original error. Could be because not enough memory?

0

Sorry, lexlap, I'm not being very forensic with this, asking you questions when the answers are before me etc...
Is that the 512KB of pre-installed memory that runs Memtest? It should run XP happily....
Hard to believe that there is a memory [Corsair stick] and a hdd problem, although bad RAM can do bad disk writes.
I would remove the original [working with Memtest] stick and replace it with the Corsair 1GB module, then test with Memtest again.
And if it runs, try with the hdd to both run memtest and boot. Tt is always possible that the system has decided that its memory is mutually incompatible.
If the hdd won't load Windows fully, then there are a couple of simple options :
-A Windows Repair - you keep your data intact, but have to upgrade the installation with all Security and Windows updates.
-Use this software [free] to burn a bootable cd; use that to create say 30GB of free space on your hdd, create a partition in it, and then install Windows with that XP cd onto that [Setup will see the new partition, and give you the option to use it. Just bypass the Activation part [do not enter your code!!!]. Then you can access your data, and also try to fix what may be wrong with the original OS in C:.
Sounds complicated, but it's not, that pgm is good.
http://www.partitionwizard.com/download.html
-The third is to use the Recovery Console to copy over registry hives created automatically in Windows/Repair/ when you upgraded... that's pretty easy, too; can also be done simply with the previous method using Explorer.

0

Sorry, lexlap, I'm not being very forensic with this, asking you questions when the answers are before me etc...
Is that the 512KB of pre-installed memory that runs Memtest? It should run XP happily....
Hard to believe that there is a memory [Corsair stick] and a hdd problem, although bad RAM can do bad disk writes.
I would remove the original [working with Memtest] stick and replace it with the Corsair 1GB module, then test with Memtest again.
And if it runs, try with the hdd to both run memtest and boot. Tt is always possible that the system has decided that its memory is mutually incompatible.
If the hdd won't load Windows fully, then there are a couple of simple options :
-A Windows Repair - you keep your data intact, but have to upgrade the installation with all Security and Windows updates.
-Use this software [free] to burn a bootable cd; use that to create say 30GB of free space on your hdd, create a partition in it, and then install Windows with that XP cd onto that [Setup will see the new partition, and give you the option to use it. Just bypass the Activation part [do not enter your code!!!]. Then you can access your data, and also try to fix what may be wrong with the original OS in C:.
Sounds complicated, but it's not, that pgm is good.
http://www.partitionwizard.com/download.html
-The third is to use the Recovery Console to copy over registry hives created automatically in Windows/Repair/ when you upgraded... that's pretty easy, too; can also be done simply with the previous method using Explorer.

Yes, the pre-installeud memory is passing the test. I only have errors when the 1 gig corsair is installed. I will try your recomendations.

0

Sorry, lexlap, I'm not being very forensic with this, asking you questions when the answers are before me etc...
Is that the 512KB of pre-installed memory that runs Memtest? It should run XP happily....
Hard to believe that there is a memory [Corsair stick] and a hdd problem, although bad RAM can do bad disk writes.
I would remove the original [working with Memtest] stick and replace it with the Corsair 1GB module, then test with Memtest again.
And if it runs, try with the hdd to both run memtest and boot. Tt is always possible that the system has decided that its memory is mutually incompatible.
If the hdd won't load Windows fully, then there are a couple of simple options :
-A Windows Repair - you keep your data intact, but have to upgrade the installation with all Security and Windows updates.
-Use this software [free] to burn a bootable cd; use that to create say 30GB of free space on your hdd, create a partition in it, and then install Windows with that XP cd onto that [Setup will see the new partition, and give you the option to use it. Just bypass the Activation part [do not enter your code!!!]. Then you can access your data, and also try to fix what may be wrong with the original OS in C:.
Sounds complicated, but it's not, that pgm is good.
http://www.partitionwizard.com/download.html
-The third is to use the Recovery Console to copy over registry hives created automatically in Windows/Repair/ when you upgraded... that's pretty easy, too; can also be done simply with the previous method using Explorer.

I replaced the preinstalled memory with the 1 gig and it failed the memtest. Does this mean the 1G is bad? It failed the test in both memory slots. I should also say that the OS wouldn't load with just the preinstalled 512.

0

Ah... well, you are in luck, cos Corsair memory modules have a lifetime warranty; take it back for a replacement.. the store should just hand you another one at your word.
Next step is to discover the reason behind the failure to load Windows fully; it could be physical hdd failure, system file corruption or reg file corruption. Sys file corruption tends to result in a Windows Repair because you can replace files manually until the cows come home. Disk damage.... well, you can download and boot with a diagnostic software tool from the maker of the disk drive itself... and that is always worth doing if you suspect a problem. Or you can jump in and create free space, then in that a new partition on which to load a temporary test installation of Windows.
You choose.
Oh, to save you burning cds all the time you can load that bootable iso onto a USB flash drive [UFD] and boot with that. The tool you need is here:
http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/
- it should find your UFD; select Diskimage, point it at your iso and Create...; then boot from the UFD.

0

FYI,
- when I attempt to run the lap with the 1GB stick and no HD I receive the following errors "PXE-E61: Media test failure, check cable" and PXE-M0F: Exiting PXE ROM...When I ran the memtest after, it failed.

- when I attempt to run the lap with the 512 pre-installed stick and no HD I receive the following errors "PXE-E61: Media test failure, check cable" and PXE-M0F: Exiting PXE ROM....When I run the memtest after, I receive no mem errors. It passed.

0

What's happening there with those PXE errors, lexlap, is that you have Network Boot in your boot order [beneath your HDD and other options]. The Intel chipset has determined that there was no boot device [you removed the hdd] before it and that there is no actual network boot server available, so it pops those messages and shuts down. No problem.
Typically, you would use network booting if you plug your lappy into a corporate network; booting would be automatic, upon demand.

Edited by gerbil: n/a

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.