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I've got a server running 2000 Server which is just about out of space on drive C. It has two logical NTFS drives, C and D on one physical HD. C started out several years ago with 4GB. Over time it has filled up. I've done the following, which has slowed the decrease, but its getting critical.

- All applications have been installed on drive D whenever possible
- Page file has been moved to drive D
- I've uninstalled every Windows component I could from Drive C.
- I added 2 GB of RAM
- I installed Diskkeeper Server
- Once a week or so I run Disk Cleanup to clear up temp files, etc.

Despite this, C drive free space hovers around 500mb, sometimes dipping as low as 300mb, and users using network resources (shared folders and Quickbooks Enterprise) are seeing some serious lag times. I believe the biggest culprit is Quickbooks, and I've now deferred taking any more updates for that and Windows, which of course poses a security problem.

I have three questions, as well as being open to any suggestions(short of replacing it)
1. Can I safely choose to compress drive space on disk C? Will it slow the computer down more and what sort of space will I gain?
2. Are there any tools out there to help me find other unneeded files on drive C? I tried using Sequoia, but its not W2K compatible.
3. Is repartitioning drive C without reinstalling the OS a possibility with a tool like Partition Magic?

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Last Post by Andrewharson
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I've gotta back caperjack here. 4GB is 4/5 of 5/8 of f***-all disk space.

Compression might yield c. 50% of 4/5 of 5/8 of f***-all and a whole load of support issues to follow.

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Using partition magic, you can re-part the Hard Drive without having to re-install or delete any files (as long as theres some free space on drive D: to expand into)

It'll require a couple of hours or so of downtime, and a reboot so it can part it before windows gets its filthy hands on it, but it should work.

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either use partition magic, or backup C with ghost or g4u, and repartition the drive. IMO a functional system should be installed on at least 12Gb partition.

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Thanks for the suggestions. Looks like Partition Magic is worth looking into. I'm wondering though, does it support W2K Server? The sys.requirements say W2K.

I always install servers with 20GB C partitions. Unfortunately, this system was installed before I was brought in. Always fun cleaning up someone else's mess.

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yeah - it's fine with W2000 Server. The important fact is that it supports FAT, FAT32 & NTFS.

The diffeence between the two is the number of processor slots supported and the amount of RAM supported.

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It appears Partition Magic will not support Windows 2000 Server according to Symantec. Anyone aware of another partition utility that does work on servers?

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yeah - it's fine with W2000 Server. The important fact is that it supports FAT, FAT32 & NTFS.

The diffeence between the two is the number of processor slots supported and the amount of RAM supported.

Have you used it on W2K Server? I just talked to some analyst at Symantec, who may or may not have known what they were talking about, and they said it would not work with 2000 Server?

This is a pretty basic Dell PowerEdge 600SC server, with 1 CPU and 3GB ram.

I suppose I could see if if the Trial version installs first.

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I was wrong. That's embarrassing. I looked up my copy of Partition Magic 7 and misinterpreted what I read in the book!

You'd be as good as the next person in researching what's out there for Server; not much from what I can see apart from:
http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/support/kb/?topic=Products&cid=111

I checked with a colleague who manages W2000 Server and the Acronis product is what he uses.

EDIT: You could ease the situation-ish by sticking in a 4GB USB stick if W2000 Server will recognise it!

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partition magic isn't supposed to mind what exactly is installed on the server, as long as the server uses a supported file system. if PM works with 2003, it should work with 2000, xp, vista etc.

but if you are reluctant to try, just ghost the c drive somewhere else, and restore it onto a larger drive

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partition magic isn't supposed to mind what exactly is installed on the server, as long as the server uses a supported file system. if PM works with 2003, it should work with 2000, xp, vista etc.

but if you are reluctant to try, just ghost the c drive somewhere else, and restore it onto a larger drive

Well, I'm once bitten twice shy on those sh*tty Norton products (NAV is the owrst anti-trojan software known to nerdkind) -

So if Partition Magic won't work on Windows Server, what makes you think Ghost will?

The USB stick doesn't seem a half bad idea - it could hold the OS, for example.

How stupid to have a 4GB server anyway! Kurtismonger is 'avin' a larf, surely?

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I agree. I'd just as soon not give Symantec any business as NAV is garbage. I didn't know 2000 Server could use a flash drive like that. Not sure it will help as RAM isn't the problem, just the free space on C. Fortunately drive D has plenty of room if repartioning will work. I guess I will download the trial of Acronis Disk Director Server to see what it can do. Thanks for all the suggestions.

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You're welcome.

BTW, the USB dribve will give you another 4GB of data or system space. It'll probably be easier to make it data space - but you can put the system on there and boot off the USB drive and hold it as (an albeit slow) system drive.

If you can be arsed to do all that system re-build!

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Well, I'm once bitten twice shy on those sh*tty Norton products (NAV is the owrst anti-trojan software known to nerdkind) -

So if Partition Magic won't work on Windows Server, what makes you think Ghost will?

The USB stick doesn't seem a half bad idea - it could hold the OS, for example.

How stupid to have a 4GB server anyway! Kurtismonger is 'avin' a larf, surely?

have you given this post at least SOME thought? GHost is not NAV, and so is PM. all those are different products that are not connected in any way. next thing you'll say is backupexec is the worst backup solution out there because it belongs to symantec, when it's actually the best thing you can use.
back to the subject: what gjost does and what PM does are completely different things aimed at completely different targets in mind. and yes, the ghost solution is very safe, especially if you use a new hdd for the new space arrangement. while PM tries to move partition markers, ghost simply copies everything.

as for the USB idea - might be worth a try as a temporary solution on a non mission critical machine. NOT for servers though.

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