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Last Post by jermaghs07
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I agree with willcomp, the PSU is my only concern. it sould probably be a 450-500w and needs a 24 pin connector. if you really want to make sure you will have enough power, just go buy an 800w, that way if you ever need to add HDDs, video cards, or just alot of fans, you'll be set.

just one question. how much computer power does it take to trade stocks? It sounds to me like your building your "dad" (wink Wink) a computer for "stock trading" (Cough, Cough). lol

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The only possible problem I see is with the memory, what OS are you going to use? YOu might want to read through this artical http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929605

AJZ

even if you do run vista, that is only a glitch in the software. the os still uses the 4GB of ram it just reports that you have less than that.

Just another glitch in Vista.... who would have seen that coming. (if you couldn't tell, i don't like vista)

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even if you do run vista, that is only a glitch in the software. the os still uses the 4GB of ram it just reports that you have less than that.

Just another glitch in Vista.... who would have seen that coming. (if you couldn't tell, i don't like vista)

I Agree with you on vista jermaghs, but what I was getting at is XP doesn't fully support 4GB. Usually you will see somewhere between 2.75GB and 3.5GB available. Although if your motherboard supports dual channel I would stick 4GB instead of 3 to take advantage of the dual channel.

AJZ

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I agree that 2x2GB is the way to go for performance. 2x1GB + 2x512MB for a total of 3GB is more cost effective but you get a small performance increase with memory controller only addressing 2 modules instead of 4.

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The only reason XP won't recognize more than 2GB of ram is because of the dual channeling. when you dual channel it is just like using half the ram but at twice the bus speed. for example. If you put 2 1GB sticks of RAM in as dual channel you are only using 1 GB of ram but instead of a 64 bit data path you are now using a 128 bit data path so your information is now traveling twice as fast. XP just doesn't recognize this verry well and will report it wrong. it will still use all the ram but your system won't moniter it.

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The only reason XP won't recognize more than 2GB of ram is because of the dual channeling. when you dual channel it is just like using half the ram but at twice the bus speed. for example. If you put 2 1GB sticks of RAM in as dual channel you are only using 1 GB of ram but instead of a 64 bit data path you are now using a 128 bit data path so your information is now traveling twice as fast. XP just doesn't recognize this verry well and will report it wrong. it will still use all the ram but your system won't moniter it.

That is incorrect. Dual channel does not reduce the amount of memory nor does it increase the bus speed. It does provide increased bandwidth (double from 64 bits to 128 bits). In theory doubling the memory controller bandwidth would double throughput but the actual real world performance increase is fairly small -- generally less than 5% in gaming and apps. More memory in single channel provides greater performance than a lesser amount in dual channel.

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Dual channeling was created to increase the bus size from the memory to the memory controller. i know it doesn't offer that much of a performance boost but if you are running a high end processor your ram can acctually be holding back your computers performance. and dual channeling is an easy performance boost.

originaly dual channel did only use half of the ram. they fixed that in the last couple of years and i didn't know that. so you where right about that.

and if you are going to fill up all of the slots why wouldn't you use dual channel? you might as well. all of the ram kind of needs to match anyway, so if i where you i would just go ahead and dual channel. even though it's not much of a performance boost it is still a good idea.

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