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Uh, I'm make a big mistake lol. I've ordered 512mb of DDR Ram when my system only takes SDRAM. the RAM I have atm is 144-pin whereas the RAM i've ordered is 200pin. The question I'm asking is, will this RAM run at all in my system?

Thanks in advance,

Slade

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    jbennet 1,618   8 Years Ago

    it would not work unless you changed the motherboard your response was utterly useless and awakening a thread from 2004 is not a good idea Read More

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woah wait up, I just saw something else:

Chip type

DDR CL2 SDRAM

what's that mean? Does that mean it's compatible with both? If so does the 200-pin part of it mean any incompatibility issues? Thanks again guys.

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sd ram has a different pin out, the slot is in a different place so it won't work. if it has ddr in the name, it's ddr even though it says sdram. it can be confusing

tommi

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woah wait up, I just saw something else:

Chip type

DDR CL2 SDRAM

what's that mean? Does that mean it's compatible with both? If so does the 200-pin part of it mean any incompatibility issues? Thanks again guys.

Just like tommi said, if the pinouts don't match, then you can't use it. But, to elaborate a little further, DDR is SDRAM. But, the SDRAM you're using could technically be called Single Data Rate SDRAM. Double Data Rate (DDR) is essentially twice as fast as "regular" SDRAM.

It's a variation on the same technology-- a variation that renders the two types of memory incompatible.

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does it matter if it is cl2 or cl3? Does that bring any compatibility issues about?

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CL2 is the CAS latency of the RAM, part of the RAM's timings. In short, the lower the number, the faster the RAM. Therefore CL2 > CL3.

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The CAS latency won't help you with compatibility in this instance.

It just ain't gonna work. :-/

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...I know that... but does the CAS latency affect the compatibility as well? Say for example I'm using cl2, I buy cl3 RAM, will it still work?

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CL can be set in your motherboard settings. What the RAM packaging has on is (CL2, CL2.5, CL3) is the recommended max. You can go under those things, but you're risking stability. You can go over (slower) without any real risk.

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Cas Latency will not effect compatibility at all. It will only effect the response rate of the memory chips themselves. If you have a motherboard which can't cater to the full reponse speed of a particular RAM module, the module will work at an accordingly reduced response timing.

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Cas Latency will not effect compatibility at all. It will only effect the response rate of the memory chips themselves. If you have a motherboard which can't cater to the full reponse speed of a particular RAM module, the module will work at an accordingly reduced response timing.

Don't you mean increased response timing Catweazle? :p

The CL (and other timings) can be a problem if you have sticks of RAM with a different rating. If you try, for example, running CL3 RAM with CL2 RAM, you may experience instability if the cheaper RAM cannot handle CL2. Then of course you just change to timings that both sticks can handle.

Votes + Comments
Helpful and clear comments which add considerably to the discussion
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The simple answer is 'yes', even though that's not technically correct.

If you have two RAM modules, in identical systems, and both modules set to operate at a clockspeed of, for example, 400MHz, then the system with its RAM timing set to cas latency 2 will outperform the system with its cas latency set to 3. The difference between the two RAM modules is quality, rather than speed. Both operate at the same clockspeed, remember.

But the but the higher quality module, which is capable of operating at the improved RAM timings, will work with stability in a system capable of using the faster timings. The RAM is still operating at the same speed, but the system is taking less time to communicate with it.

It's sorta like how some people are better than others at picking up everything a Rap singer is saying!

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Thank you guys, all of you so much.


I am now 1 point wiser.

Slade

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Nope. DDR RAM is not backwards compatible with SDRAM.

What if you change the input unit IN YOUR COMPUTER to accomadate 200 pins instead of 144?? (Take one from an DDR TOWER and put it in yours)

I dont see any reason why it wouldnt work then.......

Just thinking out loud here :)

Votes + Comments
Old post, but you're not abusing. Keep on playing around!!!
THREAD FROM 2004!!!
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What if you change the input unit IN YOUR COMPUTER to accomadate 200 pins instead of 144?? (Take one from an DDR TOWER and put it in yours)

I dont see any reason why it wouldnt work then.......

Just thinking out loud here :)

too loud ,and responding to a 4 yr old post

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IM JUST SPEAKING OUT LOUD HERE!!

Im just wondering if this would work.........

yeah ,and why you hollering now ,before you were just thinking out loud ! i have 2 questions,
1= have you ever taking a computer apart and seen a motherboard .2= where do you thing the extra 56 Leads are going to connect to ,even if it was possible for you to solder the joints

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it would not work unless you changed the motherboard
your response was utterly useless

and awakening a thread from 2004 is not a good idea

Votes + Comments
Well said.
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Nope it wont fit at all, the keying is different for 1 thing and so will not fit the slot.

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What about an external plug??

Taking a converter and plugging the DDR ram into this converter than then fits into your SD slot..... (Could work)

I like to experiment and discover things most people wouldnt notice :)

Thanx for your responses guys :)

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What about an external plug??

Taking a converter and plugging the DDR ram into this converter than then fits into your SD slot..... (Could work)
I like to experiment and discover things most people wouldnt notice :)
Thanx for your responses guys :

i bet that would work, is there such an adapter on the market

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My question would be why the hell would you want to put DDR400 or DDR2 into such an old board, thats like putting a ferrari engine into a modelT ford stock standard. It might be nice to play around but is it worth it in the end. It sounds like a huge waste of time and effort for not much difference - it wouldnt use the DDR speed anyway - adapter or no adapter - but whatever floats your boat. Good luck

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It wouldn't work. The whole concept of DDR ram is that it runs in full duplex mode, opposed to SDRAM that runs in half-duplex. It's just too dis-similar to have any potential. It would be like putting a DVD in a CD drive and trying to write software to read the data. I'm sure the laser would see some 1's and 0's but it couldn't make sense of the small chunk of the picture it was getting.

It's just not possible, you'd need a "smart" adapter with it's own memory controller and processing unit to translate the data. It's completely different technologies.

There are far worse things than unearthing an old post, some had valid content and bumping an old post that has the groundwork laid is sometimes easier than starting a new one and having to revisit every point.

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Yes,i really dont understand why people have a such a problems with dates!!

We have ore people replying to OLD POSTS on this site that are looking for answers to thier own issues,etc and its OK......

Isnt there sometihng better to worry about then when a thread was last replied to?

I have replied to a thread with a last reply in 1999!! (The link was still valid believe it or not)

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the links are always valiud because they are stored by id, not by name, that way threads can be renamed and moved and still work

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