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This is driving me nutz...I just loaded the appropriate drivers for my mouse and everything seemed fine. Rebooted the comp and then BAM! Dead...keyboard is dead and so is the mouse. No communication. I am trying to get pass the login screen with my users but I can't even get past there!! Does anyone know a way to get past the logon screen and perhaps run Sytem Restore to reset all the wrong doing? Thanks!

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Last Post by suRoot
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Boot up normally. When the logon screen appears, unplug the keyboard and mouse...then plug them back in. Things should work fine now.

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Boot up normally. When the logon screen appears, unplug the keyboard and mouse...then plug them back in. Things should work fine now.

Hey,
That didn't work...is there anyway to get to mouse to work?? I have tried using safe mode but it still brings me to the login screen. Wish there was a way to run system restore without logging in.

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If it is a standard PS/2 mouse and keyboard it should work right away. If it is a USB mouse and keyboard...perhaps USB isn't enabled in BIOS...check that. If not, I always keep an old PS/2 mouse and keyboard around to plug in...especially for fresh windows installs. I plug that in, download my motherboard drivers (which will enable USB) and then I'm up and running. What chipset (motherboard) do you have? With that information we might be able to point you in the right direction...

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If it's a PS/2 mouse, then unplugging/replugging it as described, with the system powered up, could well be what's caused the problem. You should NEVER connect or disconnect a PS/2 mouse with power to the motherboard, because the socket is liable to 'blow' and the motherboard rendered useless for a PS/2 mouse. Same goes for a PS/2 keyboard!

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Catweazle,

Sometimes my friend...especially with windows XP and 2000...that is the only way one can get it to detect. It has solved some of my mouse/keyboard problems in the last 5 yrs... And with 5VDC and barely enough amps to move a snail your chances of blowing out a PS/2 connector are very small.

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If it works for you mate, then go right ahead. I'll simply say this:

* The PS/2 socket is not designed to be hot-swappable.
* I've had many a system handed to me to troubleshoot, and found the telltale scorchmarks on the top of the PS/2 socket when I've opened them up - every one of those caused by what I described above.

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If it works for you mate, then go right ahead. I'll simply say this:

* The PS/2 socket is not designed to be hot-swappable.
* I've had many a system handed to me to troubleshoot, and found the telltale scorchmarks on the top of the PS/2 socket when I've opened them up - every one of those caused by what I described above.

well to settle the score you are both right!!! I ended up unplugging the mouse and then rebooted the computer to the login screen. I then shut the comp off, turned on the computer and the right drivers were loaded (PS/2 btw). No problem with blowing my computer into a million pieces although I did not read Cats post till now! YIKES! lucky thing nothing happened. Thank you both for pointing me in the right direction.

Gracis

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Catweazle,

Sometimes my friend...especially with windows XP and 2000...that is the only way one can get it to detect. It has solved some of my mouse/keyboard problems in the last 5 yrs... And with 5VDC and barely enough amps to move a snail your chances of blowing out a PS/2 connector are very small.

I am not trying to take away from Catweazle either, because he obviously knows his stuff.

I agree though, i always "hot swap" ps/2 devices. I had a problem with one computer running xp, where the mouse would quit being reconized every 20 minutes or so. I would always just yank it out, and plug it back in with power on. It would then be recognized. Also, on my newest system, with a certain mouse, it would start doing crazy things every few hours.. and i would just unplug with power on and plug back in. I guess it isnt a good idea. but i did what i had to do, and it still works just fine. I think i got newer drives and i no longer have issues with the mouse. But i am still using my computer that this occured on, and its ok i guess?

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he was just saying it could blow your socket... what is worse is that you can buy IDE drive caddies that allow hot swapping..even though this isn't a good idea they still sell the product!!!

at the end of the day if you break it it's your pc and your fault...

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