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Hi,

I wonder if anyone can shed a little light on the problem I'm having. Came to start up the laptop this morning and was presented with a very strange display of lines and an attempt at the HP start up logo. The whole screen was a mess of lines and it looked as though the video signal wasn't being processed properly. After a trawl through some of the threads on here I remove the memory module and cleaned the contacts. This did not alleviate the problem. I then found a copy of the service manual for this machine and set to diagnose the problem with that. I tried starting whilst pressing F10 (the default key for bringing up the boot menu on this machine). This seemed to take me to the boot menu - I was presented with a BEEP BEEP BEEP because I was still holding the key down. What I didn't get was any visual information on the screen. It was just black - rather than the off black colour off a screen with no power going to it. I tried using the up and down keys which gave a beep, but the left and right didn't beep - making me think that the cursor was at least moving somewhere.

What could be causing this problem? Has anyone come across it before? As far as I am aware the hard drive information should be recoverable if connected to another machine. Am I right in thinking this?

Any help would be appreciated.

By the way, I think it is running SP3, but I can't be certain of that. I use the auto update function so in theory the system will have all necessary updates in place.

Cheers

Anthony

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Last Post by Xetwnk
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Have you tried starting up in safe mode?

Isn't that what I did by starting whilst pressing F10?

Or is that done some other way? I did try starting whilst pressing F8 but that just gave a continuous BEEEEEEEEEEEP and no visable screen activity either.

Cheers

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You could try plugging in an external monitor in case it is the screen, but it sounds like the video card or chip thats either loose or damaged.

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Hp's are well known for their built in graphics cards failing. If it is still under warranty then get the shop to sort it. If it is out of warranty then you will need to take it to a professional and that can be very expensive indeed.

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You could try plugging in an external monitor in case it is the screen, but it sounds like the video card or chip thats either loose or damaged.

I shall have to try and borrow one.

Hp's are well known for their built in graphics cards failing. If it is still under warranty then get the shop to sort it. If it is out of warranty then you will need to take it to a professional and that can be very expensive indeed.

When you say 'built-in' does that mean attached permanently to the motherboard? I feel competent enough to strip the machine down for a board swap out if that is what it comes down to.

As an aside I looked at the link box you added to your post. In particular the post about dead PCs. I tried starting the machine up without the HDD attached and I could def see something on the screen, but the screen was doing the wonderful and weird thing it was doing before.

I await your reply.

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The motherboard, graphics card, and sound card are all on the one board. Replacing it is a huge job.

I am doing a screen replacement on a Dell Inspiron 1525 at the moment and I wouldn't take on an HP laptop motherboard replacement as an example.

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The motherboard, graphics card, and sound card are
all on the one board. Replacing it is a huge job.

I am doing a screen replacement on a Dell Inspiron 1525 at the moment and I wouldn't take on an HP laptop motherboard replacement as an example.

Cheers Rick,

Forgive my ignorance.

You say huge. Just how huge exactly. Stripping the laptop down to its component parts? I figure I take it apart, remove the old motherboard, and put in a new one. Or is there more to it that I am missing a point here?

I'm more than capable to strip the machine down and remove the old motherboard. Is there more to the actual job than just replacing old for new?

Cheers for your advice.

Anthony

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There are a lot of very small and fiddly ribbon cables within a laptop that can tear if extreme caution is not used. There are usually also different length screws holding it together, fitting the wrong one in the wrong place can completely ruin a motherboard.

If you have the time and patience and possibly a digital camera to photograph each stage then the job is possible, however, getting hold of the correct motherboard at a decent price........

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There are a lot of very small and fiddly ribbon cables within a laptop that can tear if extreme caution is not used. There are usually also different length screws holding it together, fitting the wrong one in the wrong place can completely ruin a motherboard.

If you have the time and patience and possibly a digital camera to photograph each stage then the job is possible, however, getting hold of the correct motherboard at a decent price........

Cheers Rik,

I've got the HP repair and service manual for this machine which gives all screw measurements etc so that shouldn't be an issue.

As for the purcahse of the motherboard...hmmm...

Is it worth checking it with a monitor before going ahead with the hunt for motherboard? Just in case. Is it likely to be anything else? Don't want to spend out on the motherboard just to find it wasn't the video card after all. That would be annoying.

Regards

Anthony

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It can't hurt to check it with a monitor first. Remember there is probably a function key to switch between internal screen and external monitor tho. ;)

Yayyyy!! Dell lappy in one piece and booting fine, replacement screen working perfectly. :)

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Glad to hear it Rik. Just so you all know, it is the video card. So it is the bin (or eBay) for the old workhorse unless I can find a donor for a motherboard swap. Thanks for all who helped out.

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No problem. It's just a shame that those HP laptops are so badly made and so renowned for failing. I would suggest breaking it up for parts but a lot of other HP's go the same way and it's motherboards only that are in demand.

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Just out of curiosity, how did you obtain the service-and-repair manual, exactly? I have the Ze4600 and all I want to do is reset the BIOS password -- but the process to do that involves taking the whole computer apart to get to the battery and/or reset contact. I've seen -- and may have a PDF somewhere of -- the manual that tells/shows how to do that; is that the manual you're talking about, or is there something else? The one I have, I downloaded from HP's website under the realtime-chat guidance of a service rep.

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Just out of curiosity, how did you obtain the service-and-repair manual, exactly? I have the Ze4600 and all I want to do is reset the BIOS password -- but the process to do that involves taking the whole computer apart to get to the battery and/or reset contact. I've seen -- and may have a PDF somewhere of -- the manual that tells/shows how to do that; is that the manual you're talking about, or is there something else? The one I have, I downloaded from HP's website under the realtime-chat guidance of a service rep.

It is the technical service manual from the HP website. Give a blow by blow of how to strip and rebuild. Very useful tool.

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