0

Ok, so I had a dual boot going for a while, Vista Home Premium and the RC for Win7. Without thinkin bout it I just whiped off the Win7 partition with EASEAUS partition manager. Well now every time I turn on my laptop it still displays Win7 as an option, and I need to choose Vista. It's not really a problem, more of a nuisance. So if somebody could help then it would be splendid. And I already tried to boot disk and it wont load at all, I think its a bad disk. :(

5
Contributors
4
Replies
5
Views
8 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by cgeier
0

Or you could launch msconfig in Vista, go to the Boot tab and set Windows Vista as the default OS and delete the entry for Windows 7.

0

**Warning**: This process, if improperly performed, could make your computer unbootable. It is recommended that you back up your files before proceeding.

1. Create a restore point
Control Panel -> Backup and Restore Center -> Create a restore point or change settings (on left side)

2. Open cmd window (right click and select "run as administrator")

3. type: "set USERPROFILE" (note this location)

4. Backup the system store to location above: bcedit /export %UserProfile%\bcdbackup

5. type: bcdedit /enum ACTIVE /v

6. type: bcdedit /default {<Vista identifier>}
ex: bcdedit /default {cbd971bf-b7b8-4885-951a-fa03044f5d71}

7. Look for and note the "identifier" for Windows 7

8. type: bcdedit /delete {<Windows 7 identifier>}
ex: bootcfg /delete {pka287sw-k8k1-5119-247c-wc89383w5a87}


==============================
Alternative method:

1. Create a restore point
Control Panel -> Backup and Restore Center -> Create a restore point or change settings (on left side)

2. Open cmd window (right click and select "run as administrator")

3. type: "set USERPROFILE" (note this location)

4. Backup the system store to location above: bcedit /export %UserProfile%\bcdbackup

5. type bcdedit

6. Look for and note the "identifier" for Vista

7. bcdedit /default {<Vista identifier>}
ex: bcdedit /default {current}

8. Look for and note the "identifier" for Windows 7

9. bcdedit /delete {<identifier>} /f
ex: bcdedit /delete {current} /f

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.