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I have a Gateway gt5622 desktop computer that I am working on for someone else. It has one of those cpu fans that will spead up if as the cpu heats up. It started racing fast all the time. I decided to replace the fan and heat sink. However it still heats causing the computer to freeze up. I have researched this online and found many people with the same problem but noone posted a solution. I am inclined to think that it is either the Cpu or the Motherboard but as it is 4 years old I am hesitant to recommend putting that much money in. Any thoughts would be helpful.

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Last Post by benmar
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  • hi,did you apply new thermal past on the cpu when replacing the heatsinc, Read More

  • [QUOTE=caperjack;1649600]hi,did you apply new thermal past on the cpu when replacing the heatsinc,[/QUOTE] as to the reputation added for me ,Who's Bob . lol Read More

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hi,did you apply new thermal past on the cpu when replacing the heatsinc,

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2 bob you're on the right track :)
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Is your CPU usage high? Can tell me how big is your ram, hard disk? And also what CPU you are using.

Edited by jingda: n/a

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Yes, I did.

ok,then i will assume it was a nice even thin coat ,as uneven and too thick it not good,also make sure heatsinc is making correct flat connection to cpu
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check the bios setting for cpb minimum/ maximum temp setting ,some have settings for max temp before fan speeds up

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hi,did you apply new thermal past on the cpu when replacing the heatsinc,

as to the reputation added for me ,Who's Bob .


lol

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You are:D
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dc1000,

Is it possible airflow through the case has decreased in some way?

  • Are the case fans working efficiently, oriented to maximise airflow?
  • Is the PSU fan expelling hot air?
  • Check for obstructions such as ribbon cables and blocked vents.

Has the CPU been overclocked? Running at higher speeds will produce more heat and decrease stability. Underclocking has the opposite effect, which might help you to get the system working again.

Edited by LaxLoafer: Formatting

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Nice thinking
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sorry I didn't see the other replies at first. CaperJack I think the heatsink is connected properly to CPu. There is a setting for when the fan runs. default is 60 it can be changed but if the computer is freezing up then changing that wouldn't help would it? Laxloafer the computer does not have a cpu fan but i am testing it with the side panel off and yes the cpu fan is putting out hot air. There are no obstructions to the fan.

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jingda the cpu is an intel Pentium dual e2160. I did not check the cpu usage will do that.

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I ran the computer with just system startup for an hour with no freezing.Irebooted and checked cmos cpu temp was -128c/267F rebooted with full resources and freezes in less than 10 minutes. cpu usage just before freezing was at 42 %

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correction Laxloafer I meant the computer does not have a case fan.

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dc1000,

I guessed what you really meant ;-)

128 °C / 267 °F - That sounds way too hot. Typical maximum operating temperatures for Intel CPUs is around 60-70 °C.

Have you seen smoke rising yet?

I'd be wary of putting another CPU in that motherboard until you've diagnosed the fault.

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Thanks for the help. I have an older Pentuim 2 cpu that is an option for testing it. Are there any compatiblity issues that I need to be concerned with?

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... Are there any compatiblity issues that I need to be concerned with?

The CPU sockets used by Pentium IIs are very different. I'm afraid they're not compatible at all.

If you're keen to sacrifice another processor, take a look on eBay or similar. You should find there are Pentium E2160s to be had for 20 USD or less;-)

Other CPUs that use socket LGA775 may also work, but you'll want to check they're supported by your motherboard. Can your motherboard's front side bus (FSB) and clock frequencies match the requirements of the CPU?

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Thanks for all the help. I have decided it is the motherboard and will replace the computer as it is not worth any more time.

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128c... that is just excessively high!
As a comparison: my room temprature is about 20c here, and my laptop has been breezing at 'round 80% for 6 hours on the same spot. and it's currently 85c

So i tend to agree: mayor cooling issues.
You could alternatively check your wiring, see if that could be improved, or maybe replace your computercase with something with a bigger airflow.

You could try SpeedFan and see if it can manually set your cooler speed to 100%, but to be honest, i think your processor died after all the heating.
Heat doesn't cause crashes, damaged processors do.

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I've found, on occasion, that when a processor runs too hot for no apparent reason, it's likely to be the result of an old or corrupt cpu driver, or a faulty or outdated BIOS. Reinstalling the processor driver or flashing the BIOS (or both) might solve the problem... Just something to consider if you ever run into this problem in the future.

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I've found, on occasion, that when a processor runs too hot for no apparent reason, it's likely to be the result of an old or corrupt cpu driver, or a faulty or outdated BIOS. Reinstalling the processor driver or flashing the BIOS (or both) might solve the problem... Just something to consider if you ever run into this problem in the future.

14 yrs for fiddling with computers ,and i never heard of a processor driver[it doesn't need one ] ,unless you are refereeing to the motherboard as the processor

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I did contemplate updating the bios but didn't think that would solve a heating problem. It is good to know there is a place here for help though. Thanks to all.

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I did contemplate updating the bios but didn't think that would solve a heating problem.

that makes 2 of us

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