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Hi all.

I need to know how to setup windows servers (all) to execute a logon script regardless of it being a user, local or domain, terminal server login or a service that executes the logon.

Sort of default but it must not prevent the regular group policy or user defined scripts from running. The script must be stored on the local server.

The reason being I must keep a text file audit of all entries onto a server to be monitored by control room operators.

I hope its clear enough.

Thanks.

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Last Post by Gideon
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Hi

I would of thought this would work best using the startup via Start Menu.

Stick a shortcut to your script in

C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\Startup

on each of your servers. The fact the command resides within the "all users" profile, will, as required run for all users.

Regards, David

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Problem being that we need to control principally the administrator/support staff access and the services logons on the file servers. Thus a quick delete or the on console use of the left shift will bypass or erradicate the startup programs execution of such a script/batch file inserted into the startup folder.

The use of a "global" login script is transparent and forced. However local logins and services login does not seem to fall within such a login script configuration. I can add a script for each user but is 80 file servers its maintenance is a nightmare. Like wise the use of group profiles is not possible as some of the services/users do not execute a domain logon to access these servers for maintenance. To further complicate the issue some perform terminal server sessions to access the servers for maintenance or support.

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Another problem has arisen to further complicate the issue. I cannot seem to force an interactive logon to run a script. Even if the user is supposed to execute a logon script. It seems that MS does not effect a full logon using interactive mode. Such as running a scheduled task with a user name.

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