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I have a network with 2 desktops running Windows Vista, 1 desktop running Windows XP, and 2 laptops running Windows Vista. I have a Linksys NLSU2 disk server with a 250 Gb drive attached to it. This drive is shared all over the network. From one of the desktops running Vista is happening that every time I try to erase a file in the network drive, it looks as it was erased, but if I refresh the content of the drive, I can see the file still present. However, now the file is unaccesible and if I try to erase it again, it shows a message telling that it can no be erased because there is other process using it. The weirdest thing is that if I close the session and enter it again, I can see that the file is gone. It looks like the deletion of the file is not completed until the session is logged off and on again. Any suggestion?

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Last Post by ramdaol
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Do you have the latest updates for Vista and firmware for the NAS?

Thanks for your interest in my problem. Vista is fully updated as well as NAS firmware. The other Vista computers can access shared drive without any problem.

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Uninstalling and reinstalling applications I found the guilty application: it was McAfee Virus Scan Plus. What I did to solve the problem was to disable Real Time Network Drives Analysis.

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What is this real Time Network Drives Analysis?

When you run McAfee SecutiryCenter, you go to Advanced Menu, Configure, Computer and files, and then under Antivirus Protection is Active go to Advanced... Then under Real Time Analisys you disable Network drives analisys. This way, you disable real time antivirus analisys of the network drives, which was the cause of my problem. Disabling it means that the antivirus software will not continuosly verify the network drive; just when you ask it to.

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