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Hi,

I have a query regarding a wireless setup installed for home use. I have an ASDL connection which is connected to a wireless hub. This is accessed by a basic internet PC for browsing, email etc and a high spec PC currently used for internet gaming. In addition, two other members of the household have laptops and also connect.

Now, I have Norton Anti V & Firewall on the internet PC, as well as the two laptops. Although, I have no Anti V or Firewall at all on the gaming PC to reduce lag from the firewall whilst playing a particular online game.

As I don't have any web browsing apps installed on the gaming PC, and the only connection I make is to the game servers through the client installed on my system. I assume I am relatively safe from the majority of internet threats.

However, I am not too sure of this & is kinda why I'm seeking advice here.

If, say, one of the laptop users is notoriously bad with accidentally obtaining spyware & viri. And is connected at the same time as the gaming PC with no protection, (bearing in mind, although different computers, they share the same IP address)

Is it possible for the gaming PC to infected with spyware or viruses?

I’m not sure how this works, if the laptop user is browsing loads of low quality sites, then some of these will be obtaining the IP address no?

Then when I log on with my gaming PC, am I going to subjected to incoming threats?

Thanks v much in advance

:)

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Last Post by Info@PSR
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...I have an ASDL connection which is connected to a wireless hub... (bearing in mind, although different computers, they share the same IP address)

Actually, each of the computers will have its own, unique IP if they are all connected to the same network at the same time. From your description of your setup, it sounds like you have a router, not a hub; a simple hub won't allow multiple machines to simultaneously connect to an ADSL modem. Of course, the modem itself could also be a hybrid, containing not only the modem but a router as well.

Regardless- some of the basic answers to your questions are:

* The gaming PC is definitely vulnerable, just by virtue of it being on the network, and especially because the network also connects to the Internet as a whole. Keep in mind that even a fresh installation of Windows (with no other programs installed) will leave your computer configured with a number of running services which open ports on the machine through which network-propogated infections can enter. Additionally, because you have no antivirus or firewall software installed, the gaming machine is essentially open to intrusions.

* You don't really have to worry about spyware and adware programs themselves propagating from one machine to the rest of your network, as that is not a behaviour that those types of malware have. If the gaming machine is never used for Net browsing, its chances of picking up a spyware/adware infection are greatly less than that of the other computers.

* Worms do use the network propagation method of infection, which takes us back to the antivirus/firewall issue.

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Actually, each of the computers will have its own, unique IP if they are all connected to the same network at the same time. From your description of your setup, it sounds like you have a router, not a hub; a simple hub won't allow multiple machines to simultaneously connect to an ADSL modem. Of course, the modem itself could also be a hybrid, containing not only the modem but a router as well.

Regardless- some of the basic answers to your questions are:

* The gaming PC is definitely vulnerable, just by virtue of it being on the network, and especially because the network also connects to the Internet as a whole. Keep in mind that even a fresh installation of Windows (with no other programs installed) will leave your computer configured with a number of running services which open ports on the machine through which network-propogated infections can enter. Additionally, because you have no antivirus or firewall software installed, the gaming machine is essentially open to intrusions.

* You don't really have to worry about spyware and adware programs themselves propagating from one machine to the rest of your network, as that is not a behaviour that those types of malware have. If the gaming machine is never used for Net browsing, its chances of picking up a spyware/adware infection are greatly less than that of the other computers.

* Worms do use the network propagation method of infection, which takes us back to the antivirus/firewall issue.

Excellent advice, thankyou...

:)


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