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The reason on why I am mentioning this topic is because I have noticed that many links that are listed by users here have security warnings. Despite the warnings, a study published by Carnegie Mellon mentioned that the majority of visitors ignore those warnings. So if your business site have those warnings, do you quickly pay heed?

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Last Post by MktgRob
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The reason on why I am mentioning this topic is because I have noticed that many links that are listed by users here have security warnings. Despite the warnings, a study published by Carnegie Mellon mentioned that the majority of visitors ignore those warnings. So if your business site have those warnings, do you quickly pay heed?

I would definitely pay heed and I would say that companies who ignore these warning on their site are asking for trouble. If this turns into a major issue I could easily envision Google taking action against sites that do nothing to clear up the warnings.

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definitely
the whole thing are in a long run
ans i don't want any of my links are missed
so that the circle is incomplete

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I wonder from a SEO perspective, if these security warnings (since they are not keyword or SEO related) affects PageRank. I just know that personally, if I see a site that Firefox gives me a warning, I will immediately close off that site, regardless of what it is.

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I wonder from a SEO perspective, if these security warnings (since they are not keyword or SEO related) affects PageRank. I just know that personally, if I see a site that Firefox gives me a warning, I will immediately close off that site, regardless of what it is.

Based on the everchanging algorithm that is the Google Dance, I would say that if it doesn't affect PageRank yet it will suddenly pop-up and throw a whole bunch of companies, webmasters, and SEOers into hysterics.

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Personally, I ignore the warnings. But then, I run linux and don't worry too much about infections. At work, we've been using a third-party checkout company for years. Just this summer, their certificate expired and, after numerous attempts to contact the company, we've concluded that the site is no longer maintained. It works, but they're not renewing their certificate.

I'm scrambling to switch all of our forms (a few hundred of them) over to use the syntax of a new, active, checkout company. I know that the encryption at the old site still works, but customers aren't going to know that. Phone calls bear me out.

I have no doubts that security warnings deter a significant number of potential users.

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Personally, I ignore the warnings. But then, I run linux and don't worry too much about infections. At work, we've been using a third-party checkout company for years. Just this summer, their certificate expired and, after numerous attempts to contact the company, we've concluded that the site is no longer maintained. It works, but they're not renewing their certificate.

I'm scrambling to switch all of our forms (a few hundred of them) over to use the syntax of a new, active, checkout company. I know that the encryption at the old site still works, but customers aren't going to know that. Phone calls bear me out.

I have no doubts that security warnings deter a significant number of potential users.

Glad to hear you are having success in avoiding these issues. Watch out with Linux because eventually the hackers and the virus idiots will come gunning for the Linux world. It is inevitable, especially as linux use keeps growing.

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