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K, I want to get more RAM for my comp, i need DDR2 5300 sodimm, i think i'll go with a gig. The problem came when I was looking on the internet for a place to buy it.

I found this, for $90
GB Micro 1GB DDR2 SODIMM PC5300 667MHz

and then this, for $169
PATRIOT 1GB PC2-5300 667MHZ DDR2 SO-DIMM 1 RANK

My question is, is there a difference between pc2 and just pc? Im NOT asking for the difference between ddr and ddr2, I already know that.

CPU-Z says I have pc2-5300, so evidently there is some importance there. If theres no difference between the two, then why the big price difference?

The only way I see these differ is aesthetically really. On the pics, the 1st one has what looks like 8 large chips, meanwhile the second has only 4, which is exaclty the same as the one thats already in my computer. The clock speeds are the same, so wtf?

Can someone just make things a little clearer for me?:confused:

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Last Post by pie.spy
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Is pc2 just a redundant way of saying ddr2, though sort of dumb because pc and ddr refer to different aspects?

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you need ddr2 - 5300 ram, and you will see different prices when looking at ram based on manufacturing tollerances and the chips used on the dimm modules. better chips and better manufacturing means higher prices. but it's worth paying more if you just want the toss the ram in and have it work forever (corsair, ocz, crucial, super talent).

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Hey,

First, I want to confirm that you are upgrading a laptop, because the memory you list is for a laptop.

OK, to answer your question briefly--in order to avoid confusion, you can just look at MHz (667, 533, etc) and the technology designation DDR or DDR2 or DDR3, etc.

The PC5300 or PC25300 designations are less uniform ways of labeling memory and they can get you into trouble. In this case there is no difference, and you would be fine either way, but there are times when the lack of a 2 in PC2, for example, could lead you astray.

So, in this case, there are no differences in the memory that you listed.

Now, the pricing you listed in a much greater concern. You can pick up a 1GB stick for around $30 USD on advertisement.

I work for Kingston Technology and you can usually find our products for this part on advertisment every week at atleast one retailer. If you want to get memory stick guaranteed to work in your machine check out www.shop.kingston.com

The pricing you listed is more in-line with branded memory pricing, so if you are going to shell out that kind of money you might as well get a memory module guaranteed to work in your machine and backed by Kingston.

Just shoot me an email if you have any questions!

Bryan Choate

K, I want to get more RAM for my comp, i need DDR2 5300 sodimm, i think i'll go with a gig. The problem came when I was looking on the internet for a place to buy it.

I found this, for $90
GB Micro 1GB DDR2 SODIMM PC5300 667MHz

and then this, for $169
PATRIOT 1GB PC2-5300 667MHZ DDR2 SO-DIMM 1 RANK

My question is, is there a difference between pc2 and just pc? Im NOT asking for the difference between ddr and ddr2, I already know that.

CPU-Z says I have pc2-5300, so evidently there is some importance there. If theres no difference between the two, then why the big price difference?

The only way I see these differ is aesthetically really. On the pics, the 1st one has what looks like 8 large chips, meanwhile the second has only 4, which is exaclty the same as the one thats already in my computer. The clock speeds are the same, so wtf?

Can someone just make things a little clearer for me?:confused:

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Alright thanks you all. Yes, i am upgrading a laptop. I have everything figured out. Thx Brchoate for your invite to use kingston, we do use it for our home built pc, but i think im gonna go with crucial for this because thats what sits in my laptop already.

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