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I've seen people here recommended using msconfig to disable services, but in a class I took, the instructor said that Selective Startup should only be used to help resolve issues -- as a diagonstic tool; other then that, Windows should be set to Normal Startup. This is why I always recommend using the Services tool for changing process startup options (and you also get the Automatic and Manual options there). What is your opinion on this?

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Last Post by DMR
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well by fiddling around with services I managed to screw up a computer, wheras I've never had any problems after using msconfig. That's why I use msconfig anyway...

:lol:

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I think the choice should depend upon the user's level of proficiency. If a person is learning to configure their system, then msconfig is certainly the appropriate tool to use. Changes made can be easily reversed.

Once a user is well into the level where you could claim them to be an 'intermediate' user, or beginning to be an 'advanced' user, then using other tools is definitely more appropriate. But before using tools such as you describe, a user needs to be able to distinguish what actually is a 'service' and what is not.

I'm quite sure the advice that instructor gave was aimed at advanced users ;)

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I think the pertinent point here is that people should be advised from the outset not to fiddle around with services simply for the sake of doing so. If there is a specific reason to disable a service, then fine. But it should only ever really be done as part of a procedure to address a particular problem.

Some people like to trim down Windows Services as part of an attempt to wrest extra performance from their system. I personally NEVER do so. In my view, if you don't have enough performance then you don't have enough computing power ;)

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I think the choice should depend upon the user's level of proficiency. If a person is learning to configure their system, then msconfig is certainly the appropriate tool to use. Changes made can be easily reversed.

Once a user is well into the level where you could claim them to be an 'intermediate' user, or beginning to be an 'advanced' user, then using other tools is definitely more appropriate. But before using tools such as you describe, a user needs to be able to distinguish what actually is a 'service' and what is not.

I agree. The Services tool gives you finer control, but you do need to know what you're doing. Try disabling the RPC service, for example, if you want some fun.

... not that I ever personally... um, well, I mean... not on purpose anyway... :p

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By the way- what the heck is this doing in the "Spyware" forum?

Moving to Win 2000/XP/Bla....

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DaveSW -- No, that link wasn't the reason for the question, but now that I've read it, it's similar to the explaination my instructor gave.

DMR -- I know this was in the wrong forum, but the spyware forum is where people were recommending the use of msconfig so I thought they would respond and explain why. Didn't work out that way though.

Catweazle -- Do any of use really have enough computing power???
Seriously though, there are some things that I only use once or twice a year that don't need to be running all the time, things like quicktime and musicmatch come to mind (I think those are the correct names), but I know there are others as well.

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QuickTime and MusicMatch are not Windows Services mate, they're software applications!

Services are Windows functions, which run in the background and are called on by software applications in order for tasks to be performed.

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DMR -- I know this was in the wrong forum, but the spyware forum is where people were recommending the use of msconfig so I thought they would respond and explain why. Didn't work out that way though.

That's along the lines of my reasons for the move. While the use of msconfig is suggested in the course of some malware troubleshoots, both msconfig and services.msc are tools which are more often used in other/wider areas of Windows administration. I felt your question concerning a comparison of the two utilities in general to be of a broader nature and deserving of a wider audience; hence the move to a general Win forum.

:)

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QuickTime and MusicMatch are not Windows Services mate, they're software applications!

Services are Windows functions, which run in the background and are called on by software applications in order for tasks to be performed.

True- and therein lies one of the differences between the use of msconfig and services.msc: while services.msc gives you finer control over Windows services, it is not responsible for controlling Windows applications which may put auto-start entries in the Registry, Startup Items folder, etc.; msconfig is more the tool for that.

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