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I recently found out that the motherboard in my desktop is faulty, and I will be replacing it with a new motherboard soon, is there any way to keep a (stable) copy of windows without having to reinstall? I just built this computer, so I do not want to install windows again unless it is absolutely necessary.
anyways, the motherboard I have now is a Gigabyte, and I am switching it out with a DFI. Both motherboards use the Intel X58 chipset, I do not have hardware RAID set up I am assuming that I would just uninstall the Gigabyte drivers and do a driver sweep (or edit the registry keys) but someone told me it is not that simple, and could give me BSODS and errors regardless

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Last Post by cguan_77
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If you keep the hard-drive with vista installed, then it's fine.

Even though the mother board/chipset drivers are completely different?
I don't think so.

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It wont work. A repair may do the trick.

Also if its an OEM copy of windows, you will probably have to ring up and explain when it comes to activation (try and blag)

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Hi I don't think it will work but you could try .If it works and you need to reactivate windows then just tell them you recoved your copy from a major virus attack.I have owned both a dvi and gigabyte board.There bios set up is quit differnent wicth leads me to supect that they are desinged quit diffently.
Sorry but i think you are going to have to reinstail.You should do a clean reinstal anyway as you could get old drivers from your old broad confecting with your new drives for your new broad ect.
Sorry could not be of more help

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A repair possibly would work, but otherwise it would require a reinstall, i would do a reinstall just so nothing gets confused and crashes.

Good Luck,

Cohen

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as Cohen suggested, just do a re-install so you can still have some of your data..but some of your application programs might need to re-install....

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