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Ok so since Friday the 13th last January my computer mysteriously shut down. I was left without a computer for months so I transfered over my harddrive onto a different computer so I could continue my work. This was a temporary setup, however my My Documents, Recycled Bin, and Windows folders were all changed in name. For example, Windows is now Windous. I'm assuming its some sort of safety precaution so that the files don't get mixed up and mess up the computer. Now the files are dead, and they can't be opened with any known programs simply because you can't "Open With" a folder... or can you? These files are dead, but I have stuff in them I would like to preserve. Are they gone forever, or is there a way I can bring them back from the dead?

-Thanks for reading
eXistenZ

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Last Post by gemini4
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The file system is corrupt. The operating system would not change the name of the system folder from Windows to Windous to avoid confusion. Do a check disk. Right click on you drive in my computer and choose properties. Go to tools on the top. Click error checking. Put checkmarks in both boxes. Click start. If you are being asked to reboot say ok and reboot.

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I forgot to mention that the hard drives have been changed, and the one with the corrupt files is now the slave drive. However, the option tools isn't available in the XP version to my knowledge. I'm not sure where to go from here. If they're not changed to avoid confusion, then they must have changed when the registry was changed on them. Still, is there any known way I can return then to their normal folder state, and get the stuff I need out of them?

Thanks again
eXistenZ

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What tools option? There isn't one in Windows XP, and I'm not sure how to run an error check on this slave drive.

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In windows XP right clicking on the drive and choosing properties brings up the screenshot that I posted. In the screenshot you can see Tools on the top. Please belive me that option is available in XP I didn't make that screenshot up.:)

What drive letter has your slave drive e: f:? If you can't find the tools tab you can do the following:

Click Start,
Choose Run,
Execute CMD
Type chkdsk /f your_drive_letter:
Hit enter

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