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I have a friend computer and their kids have put in password in XP. Their mother wants to see their files, but her 13 yrs old son will not give her his pawword. She is register as a administrator. How can I get pass his password?

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Last Post by paradox814
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The administrator should be able to delete the account, reset the password and see files. Because of security reasons I can and will not post any information on hacking. Please do not PM me for it either. But the administor should be able to do the above listed things.

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Login as administrator --
Go to control panel --
go to user accounts --
Select the user you want to change the password of --
There should be an option for changing password there.

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I see no problem with providing that information either. The facility to do so is a documented feature of Windows.

To learn how to log in as 'administrator' see this article.

If people have sensitive and important data stored on their PCs, then setting a password is not sufficient protection, I'm afraid, and withholding information here about documented OS features and procedures is not going to help them!


The main consideration in this instance, however, is that of Privacy. That child may be 13 years old, but he still has a right to his own privacy. As a parent and grandparent myself, I'd accept that if there is reason for concern, checking a PC for signs of offensive or dangerous material may be warranted. I do NOT, on the other hand, think that there is justification for accessing a child's PC and reading things like private diaries, documents and other writings, or other similarly personal information and files.

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I have a better solution...

If your child will not give you the password, take away the computer.

There is NO justification for behavior like that...

Having a PC is not some guarantee in the constitution...

Lock him or her out and have them use the PC at the public library...

You can also boot up ANY linux live cd like Mepis or Knoppix and passwords no longer matter...

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I have a better solution...

If your child will not give you the password, take away the computer.

There is NO justification for behavior like that...

Having a PC is not some guarantee in the constitution...

Lock him or her out and have them use the PC at the public library...

I second that idea.

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The mother should be able to go to c:\documents and settings\[username]\my documents. Or view any file created on any drive.

The stealth approach may be better if the kid is just defending his privacy, rather than has something to hide. Then if he is guilty.....

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Hello,

The local administrator can reset the password at the flick of her wrist.

I also agree that if you are under my roof, and a minor, I can and will inspect at a moment's notice. While I do think that minors need some privacy, it is my role as parent to be responsible for the actions. And if the law is involved, guess who is liable too?

This situation is beautiful for parents to discuss the concepts of liability, responsibility, and accountability.

Christian

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I have an idea the entire mother is not there.
The MOTHER is the admin, but the OP (who is apparently not the mother) wants to get into the account.

Makes me think the OP is a brother or sister to the account which (s)he wants to gain access too, iow the OP indeed wants to break into the account without administrative privileges which is cracking.

Christian, please remove the link to password cracking tools...

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The mother should be able to go to c:\documents and settings\[username]\my documents. Or view any file created on any drive.

The stealth approach may be better if the kid is just defending his privacy, rather than has something to hide. Then if he is guilty.....

that won't worked if his folders are marked as private on a ntfs file system (default on win xp)

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