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I wasn't sure where to post this but I figured that I would post it here as I'm using windows 7

Anyway, to my problem.

Here's the situation: At the moment I am living at a boarding school and have my desktop, running windows 7, connected to the wireless network. I was recently looking into connecting my computer to the servers so that I can access my school files from my desktop.
I found a tutorial on the ICT services page for doing this on a mac and that is to connect to an afp server (afp://tkslx10.school.edu.au, with a few other for connecting to other network drives) now I realize that there is a slim chance of me connecting to said server from a windows machine.
However considering that I know that those servers do exist and all of the school workstations are connected to the same server (same name, different protocol) and are all running windows XP it should therefore logically be possible to connect to that server via my desktop.

The issues which I believe may hinder such a thing are:
The school workstations are connected to a wired network, whilst my desktop is connected to a wireless network. When I check out the network map from a school workstation I can see a massive list of network drives and all the other computers, when I check out the network map from my desktop I can just see other students personal machines, not the school machines.

I have tried replacing afp with ftp and ignoring the protocol all together, I even got as far as a login screen, however I simply couldn't log in (got to the login by using map network drive>Folder: \\tkslx10\DATA\Y2010\Username, this is the folder that exists on the school workstations) however I couldn't log in even if I changed my login domain.


So that's it, any help would be great and very appreciated, and if I have posted this in the wrong spot than tell me and ill re-post in the correct location.

Thanks

(Sorry about the long post)

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Last Post by Adriane Houk
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i think first of all you should check if the school server is on the same subnet you are on. simply do a ping to the server and ipconfig and compare the network bits. however you said you could see the login screen that means your pc is at lease seeing the server and firewall or any checkpoint software aren't blocking it. if it is the case that you just can't login to the school server, then it is authentication thing. you need to ask the school network admin about it. There are certain share folders are for school admin only.

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Edited by crunchie: removed fake sig.

Votes + Comments
Great post, covered eveything
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i think first of all you should check if the school server is on the same subnet you are on. simply do a ping to the server and ipconfig and compare the network bits. however you said you could see the login screen that means your pc is at lease seeing the server and firewall or any che..................

Thanks for the reply, I figured I must have been getting to something but was confused about why I couldn't log in, good idea that it might be an authentication issue, I'll go and ask our admin later.


Thanks

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You need to install the Novell client (as all Windows XP Computers in this school have it) and use your school login to connect. The Client is available free from the novell website ( i think there is a windows 7 version)...

Windows normally uses the SMB protocol to connect. These servers require authentication from the client to be able to connect. I'm not sure if there is any AFP client for windows, but this would enable you to connect without the novell client installed.

ICT Services will be able to help more with this.

Hope this helps.

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k2k is right, you need to simply ping to the server and check if your on the same subnet, much better if you'll ask your school admin about it. S/he might do something about it. Actually windows 7 is not yet stable OS therefore they can still be bugs in terms of networking. I don't know about this. I'm using Win 7 in our girls boarding school and I don't see any problem with our network.

About the boarding school network, it may not be wireless so your computer cannot detect it. The list of available wireless networks might be from students or your school's department. You would be lucky if you get connected on one of those networks. The main reason why schools keep their networks wired or secured is because of information theft and network security.

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