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Last Post by TudorBran
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You should not need to do so! If you look in program files you will find that there are two versions: One is program files, and the other program files(x86).
The first deals with 64 bit and the (x86) set of files deals with 32 bit and all quality 64 or 32 bit programs should run in win 7 seamlessly and invisibly to the user. If you have a 32 bit program that won't run properly you may have to take on administrator rights and you can use compatibility mode for earlier versions (32 bit) of windows;
Beyond that you cannot change 64 to 32 as the motherboard is built with '64' wires around it instead of 32. (oversimplified version of the truth!)
M

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I agree, that there should be no need to switch to 32 bits.

If you wanted to so anyway, you will have to obtain a 32 bits version of Windows and install it instead of your current installation.

I've seen it is possible to convert a 32 bit license to 64 bit, but I don't think it goes the other way around.

Beyond that you cannot change 64 to 32 as the motherboard is built with '64' wires around it instead of 32. (oversimplified version of the truth!)

You lost me here.
Any 64 bit computer I've come accross (including three of my own) are all fully capable of running both 32- and 64bit OS'es.

Furthermore I have never seen a motherboard specific for either x86 or x64.
It is the CPU that is either 32 bits or 64 bits, and a 64 bits OS won't install on a 32 bits CPU but the other way around shouldn't be an issue.

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Why exactly do you want to change to 32-bit? changing to 32-bit will limit the amount of RAM you can install too.
Also Excizted is correct in saying that you can install a 32-bit os on a 64-bit machine. It is the CPU that is 64 or 32-bit

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Not only will there be several editions of Windows 7, but you will also need to decide if you will be running a 32-bit or 64-bit version operating system. If your CPU is more than a few years ago a good chance that you can run 32-bit version of Windows 7, but if you have a modern processor you may have to choose between each version.

Edited by hardley12: n/a

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One thing is the choice, and I think you should only choose 64-bit if you need it for extra RAM, but that's my opinion - anyway, it does not really seem like he's choosing, he's more like switching FROM 64-bit, which I think is ridiculous :)

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I've seen it is possible to convert a 32 bit license to 64 bit, but I don't think it goes the other way around..

my copy of win7 ultimate came with 2 dvd's one 32bit and on is 64 bit

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my copy of win7 home premium upgrade came with both 64 & 32 bit with instructions for either version. Later---

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My idea was that 64 bit, automatically was an advance on 32, although certain 32 bit programs don't work?

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Like those above me said, if you plan to use more than 4 GB RAM, you should choose the 64 Bit version. Otherwise, the 32 Bit version will still work fine for you.

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