0

Hey, never posted here before but this has got me stumped.

When I try to play streaming audio or video from certain sites (I've only noticed it on mlb.com and nfl.com) my internet freezes and stops working for around 60 seconds and never plays the file. A little box pops up and says my internet connection is unplugged when it is obviously still connected.

Other sites with streaming audio and video, such as ESPN, work fine. Is there a plug-in I'm missing or some other fix perhaps? It really is bothering me so I was hoping one of you may have an idea. Thanks.

3
Contributors
7
Replies
8
Views
10 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by MidiMagic
0

after I installed the new real player it works fine...Im using firefox...check to see what your running at like 10mpbs, 100mbps etc

0

did you download realplayer?????

Yes I do have Realplayer, the newest version. I have the right audio and video drivers as well. Also it's in XP just so you know. It really has me stumped.

0

after I installed the new real player it works fine...Im using firefox...check to see what your running at like 10mpbs, 100mbps etc

Perhaps I'll have to try Firefox. I deinstalled realplayer and redownloaded and that didn't work.

0

Several possibilities:

1. Is your connection speed too slow for the download. If so, the player stops until the connection can catch up. This is normal.

2. You may be waiting for one of those maddening ads to load first. Look at the status line to see what the browser is doing.

3. The server is overloaded. Too many people are trying to download something from it at the same time.

4. Your ISP is overloaded. Too many people using your internet service company are trying to download stuff at the same time.

5. Your ISP is blocking certain downloads to protect itself from the nasty old RIAA and its lawsuits.

6. Two different programs are fighting over the use of the soundcard.

0

Several possibilities:

1. Is your connection speed too slow for the download. If so, the player stops until the connection can catch up. This is normal.

2. You may be waiting for one of those maddening ads to load first. Look at the status line to see what the browser is doing.

3. The server is overloaded. Too many people are trying to download something from it at the same time.

4. Your ISP is overloaded. Too many people using your internet service company are trying to download stuff at the same time.

5. Your ISP is blocking certain downloads to protect itself from the nasty old RIAA and its lawsuits.

6. Two different programs are fighting over the use of the soundcard.

1. Cable Internet: most streaming videos start immediately and with no pausing or loading. It doesn't just stop the video. It stops all internet until I close the connection. It comes up with a message: "Network Cable is unplugged."

2. Doesn't seem to explain causing the internet to stop.

3. I guess could be server but I've never heard of it causing that.

4. Comcast Cable; never really seen it overload.

5. It's streaming video (live radio on MLB which I pay for) so I don't think it would be this.

6. Possible but does this stop internet?

Thanks again for your help.

0

It's not really stopping the internet. It may be stopping your connection.

Several more thoughts:

1. Your TV (in another room?) might be using other cable services which compete for bandwidth with the internet connection. A DVR in the cable box is an example.

2. The cable company might be having trouble.

3. You might have too many devices connected to the cable.

4. You could have an "illegally connected" device on the cable (such as a TV connected using the wrong kind of cable, or a very old television with leaky RF circuitry).

5. Are you exceeding your download quota? Some ISPs have limits on how much bandwidth you can use at one time.

6. Is the ISP disconnecting you for using a service they also offer as a pay TV service?

7. Is your modem too close to the monitor?

8. Your ISP may apportion download time by serially switching between customers.
Then your browser times out before it gets back to you.

9. Someone in your neighborhood might be stealing cable service.

10. The file type may be one the cable box doesn't know how to transfer, or one the cable box thinks belongs to the cable service (and thus, the TV, not the internet).

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.