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ok guys thanks for all the help, I got everything and installed it and let me say OMG! the amd 64 kicks ass!
NFSU2 runs on full settings perfectly and my FPS on CS:S went from 20 to 90-130

Now I just need to tweak my AMD 64
my ram is running at 200Mhz I think thats max(if it isnt my mobo wont let me set it any higher)
now what do I do with the CPU FSB? the frequency is at 200 right now is that right?
and the agp frequency is at 66 at that good? or what do I have to do to tweak the pc
its fast enough right now, but I want to make sure im getting the most out of the amd 64 without damaging it.
BTW its a DFi LanParty motherboard.

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Last Post by szukalski
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Your system bus is the speed that everything on the system communicates at, often referred to as FSB.
If you raise it, you raise the overall speed of the system including your CPU.
Your RAM runs at the system bus speed unless you employ a FSB:RAM ratio.
If you don't want to overclock your RAM, use this ratio to keep your RAM running at 200MHz when you increase the system bus.
ie. if system bus speed is 250MHz then your ratio would be 250:200 ::= 5:4 to keep your RAM running at 200MHz. (A theoretical ratio for an example).
But since your RAM needs to communicate with your system bus, if it's working on a ratio, it's not going to be the fastest your system can go because your RAM can't communicate with your bus on every cycle.
ie. at 5:4, the system bus lines up with the RAM at every 5th cycle.
This will increase your procesor speed, but it's not making the most that your system can provide.
BUT it is saving the very real possibility of your RAM frying itself because it's likely you'd have to raise the voltage to your RAM (vdimm) in order to let it run at faster speeds.
You could also overclock your board (which is good for it) by decreasing your multiplier, increasing your FSB, and keeping your CPU speed at the stock, again, employing the FSB:RAM ratio if you dont' want to overclock the RAM.
The agp frequency is good at 66/67, this will keep your video card running at the same speed while the system bus increases.
Read up before doing any changes though, and understand what you're doing.
Another thing to be aware of is your HT ratio, which is probably 5x, you'll need to lower it to 4x when your system bus is 200-250MHz, and to 3x beyond 250MHz.
HT x system bus =< 1000.

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Get what up to 1600MHz? You mean the processor at 2600MHz?
The system bus has a max of about 297MHz..
CPU speed = system bus x multiplier (2400 = 200 x 12)
So you could increase your system bus to ~217MHz to get your cpu running at 2600MHz (2600 = ~217 x 12) but this raises the issues of your RAM which I stated before, in which you have two options : overclock your RAM to run at 217MHz with your system, or run a FSB:RAM ratio, which will let your CPU run at 2600MHz but won't be optimal for the system at that speed.
Again, I must stress to understand what is going on when you are changing any values in your system. Knowledge is power and ignorance invites destruction.

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The clockspeed is 200MHz. Data is 'quad-pumped' making that an effective 800MHz bus. Data flows in two directions concurrently making that an effective 1600MHz dataflow. It's already at that rate, so you don't have to do anything to get it there ;)

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The 1600MHz figure you're talking about is the speed at which the chip communicates with the memory, the HTT. But your RAM still runs at the speed of the system bus.
The bus speed of the K8 chips (AMD 64) is 200MHz(200,000 clock cycles per second), and they send two sets of instructions per clock cycle so the implemented bus speed is 400MHz, even though the system is still running at 200MHz.
If you can get your system bus to run at 1600MHz, then your RAM is in for a big surprise. Have an extinguisher handy as well.

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I have a question sometimes my windows media player takes like 2 secs to open others it takes 20 secs, is that part of the cool and quite technology? and can I disable cool and quite with out harming the cpu?

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You can disable cool'n'quiet without harming the cpu.
In fact, if you want to do any overclocking, you NEED to disable this.
I'm not sure about the time it takes to open media player though, whether it is related.
For your overclocking needs, check out www.dfi-street.com . They have a couple of DFI technicians, as well as the famed Oskar Wu, on board.

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