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Here's a problem I'm throwing to the Tech Gods....

I have a client whose recently been having some problems with a certan batch of machines and no one seems to have a clue why the problem can't be remedied. She's got about 30 computers in this batch, and the problem is intermittent with all of them. Many, coming from a fresh boot, will not have any audio. She's eliminated any 3rd party software that may have been causing it, and even re-imaged the machines from ghost discs that have proven to work. Afte the first re-image, all machines booted fine with sound. Then she renamed them and registered them into her domain, and that's when the problems started again. She's got the newest BIOS updates and Drivers installed, but that doesn't seem to fix the problem. Anyone have any suggestions, or better yet, a solution?

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Last Post by excellence
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You sure the drivers aren't corrupt? I mean, there could be a virus corrupting the drivers after installation(the ghost image may have the virus). Also, run a chkdsk with a surface scan (from the recovery console) to fix any disk related problems. Try using a different soundcard to eliminate hardware faults.

Lastly, check that the cables are all plugged in securely.

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goldeagle2005,

For every machine after install:Start >> Run >> type: cmd >> type: sfc /scannow

This command will allow the computer's current Windows System files be replaced by fresh factory versions from the CD, which may be corrupt. I would advise using a known WORKING copy of Windows, rather than any copies assiciated with the issue in question.

Another point to mention, and goldeagle2005 was on the right track, however I don't believe the drivers are corrupt. The problem is most likely assiciated with Windows Plug & Play versions of the audio drivers. I would advise downloading the correct OEM version of the audio drivers.

J_

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Agreed. The absolute WORST place to get hardware device drivers is from Microsoft. If the 'newest drivers' have been sourced from Microsoft rather than from the hardware manufacturer, then that could well explain the problem.

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The funny thing was, is that after re-imaging the machines even with a new image that wasn't connected to the problem, the machines worked fine until they were renamed and then connected up with the domain. It's just baffling. We seem to have eliminated all traces of hardware problems (isolated Sound Card, speakers, all tested) but this just seems to be one of those nifty little Microsoft problems. Either way, I will pass the advice on, thanks y'all.

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